Lummi Island Community Land Trust Biological Conditions Assessment of the beach north of the Lummi Island Ferry Landing

Lummi Island Community Land Trust Biological Conditions Assessment

of the beach north of the Lummi Island Ferry Landing

Prepared by: Chris Fairbanks Fairbanks Environmental Services

517 Briar Road Bellingham, WA 98225 July 16, 2008

To download (large doc file) full report: Assessment Report – Fairbanks

July 16, 2008 Fairbanks Environmental Services

Executive Summary

Lummi Island Community Land Trust contracted Fairbanks Environmental Services, Inc and Coastal Geologic Services, Inc to complete and assessment of biological conditions and coastal processes along a beach to the north of the Lummi Island Ferry landing. Biological conditions of the marine riparian, upper beach, and intertidal zone are good and natural processes are functioning well to maintain a moderately healthy ecosystem. The assessment of coastal processes was conducted by Coastal Geologic Services, Inc and a summary report was completed as a separate memorandum.

Threats to the environmental health of the study area is primarily from stormwater from the ferry landing loading area that transports contaminants from the road surface and pet wastes directly into the study area. Collection and treatment of this stormwater should be given a high priority. The study area is located near the Strait of Georgia and the Cherry Point reach where ship traffic and transfer of petroleum products have the potential for discharge of cargo and fuel into the marine waters. Lummi Island Community Land Trust should include emergency oil spill response action planning into their public education program. Additional actions to enhance existing habitat in the marine riparian zone that would also provide benefits to intertidal habitat include:

1. Remove creosote treated timbers from the beach.

2. Plant additional native species of trees and shrubs in the riparian zone.

3. Establish a riparian community along the ferry landing shoreline where riprap has been placed; this may be done if an access trail is constructed.

4. Place additional large wood features at the toe of the bluff.

5. Retain large wood such as the Douglas fir trees when they fall onto the beach; do not allow trees to be cut and removed from the beach.

6. Protect water quality in the small stream that drains through the culvert in the study area.

For more: Download (large doc file) full report: Assessment Report – Fairbanks


 

 

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